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Last Update: 01 May 2017
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In the Beginning …..


The SSPCA began its work in Kuching in 1959, formed by a small group of expatriate officers who were moved by the sight of the diseased dogs and sick animals that roamed the streets. It was legally registered under the Registrar of Societies as the “Kuching Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (KSPCA) on 11 September 1962.


In 1977, the Society changed its name to the Sarawak Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, or SSPCA. In the years that followed, dedicated volunteers and their very active cadre of Junior Members, organised awareness - raising events, rescued and re-homed stray animals, initiated a pilot neutering scheme, and organized fundraising events. They were also instrumental in reaching an agreement with the local councils in Kuching to house and care for all the stray animals picked up by these councils. It’s an agreement which has carried through to this day, and remains the only formal arrangement between an animal welfare organization and local councils in Malaysia. 


Perhaps their most notable achievement was securing tax-deductible status for the Society. This has proved an invaluable asset to the Society in its fundraising efforts.


In 1999, through the generosity of the Sarawak State Government, the SSPCA secured a 0.6-acre piece of land at 61/2 mile Penrissen Road, Kuching on which to build its animal shelter. In the years since, this little piece of land has served as a refuge, a haven for thousands of stray, abused and abandoned animals. Some have been fortunate enough to be given a second chance at life, others have lived out their days in the loving care of our shelter staff, and many have gone on to the ‘Great Kennel in the Sky’. As our finances improved, we expanded and improved the Shelter facilities and services to cater for the ever-increasing number of animals brought to our door. Unfortunately, this meant having to make sacrifices and utilise the exercise/play areas.